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Market Intelligence Reports

  1. Industry & Market Report: Australian Waste Industry – Blue Book 2007
  2. Industry & Market Report: Australian Waste Industry – Blue Book 2001
  3. Independent Review of Industry & Market Report

Policy & Strategy Papers

  1. Directions for the Waste Management Industry
  2. Shifting the Paradigm to Resource Management
  3. Strategies and Options for Implementing the NSW Waste Inquiry Recommendations
  4. Waste to Resources: The Challenge to Industry & Government
  5. Eco-efficiency: Industrialists Point of View
  6. A Framework For Sustainable Recycling
  7. Waste Minimisation & Recycling Performance Review
  8. The Waste Management Industry in the Next Millennium
  9. Setting the Context for Alternative Waste Technologies
  10. A Tool for Crafting the Vision for Sustainable Waste Management
  11. Waste Management Sector Skills Audit and Analysis

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Market Intelligence Reports

1. Industry & Market Report: Australian Waste Industry – Blue Book 2007

"This Industry and Market Report is essential reading and a key reference for all
involved in waste management and resource recovery be they practitioner, operator, regulator, consultant, academic, investor, or supplier…"
– Dr David Garman, Executive Director, Environmental Biotechnology CRC

Click here for article: Blue Book 2007 Issue 21 INSIDE WASTE.pdf

Click here for Order Form: Blue Book Order Form.pdf

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2. Industry & Market Report: Australian Waste Industry – Blue Book 2001

WCS Market Intelligence has assembled a comprehensive Industry and Market Report on the Australian Waste Industry. This strategic market document will be an essential reference for anybody involved, or thinking of involvement, in the waste management and resource recovery sector in Australia.

Material assembled profiles the industry, the key players, the amounts of waste generated around the country, the key drivers influencing the industry and the industry concentration to be found in this rapidly evolving sector. Market analyses and commentary on competitive issues, makes this the most informed publication on the waste management sector in this country. More than just statistics, the WCS Market Intelligence Industry and Market Report for the Australian Waste Industry presents the background to the industry and the shaping forces that are creating the pressures for change

The contents are outlined in the attached downloadable file. The full report can be purchased from WCS Market Intelligence by contacting admin@wrightstrategy.com

Click here for full document: Industry & Market Report - Brochure & Order Form

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3. Independent Review of Industry & Market Report

Click here for document: Independent Review of Industry & Market Report


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Policy & Strategy Papers

1. Directions for the Waste Management Industry

The changes that are emerging within the waste management and resource recovery industry can be seen in most jurisdictions, to varying degrees. In Europe, strong regulatory regimes are driving change through economic imperative, whilst in the USA free market philosophies are fostered within regulatory frameworks that set relatively high level environmental outcomes.

In Australia, we are progressing along a path of change that blends bits of both the European and the US approach, in our own unique formula. In this regard, NSW can be considered as one of the jurisdictions in Australia setting the pace in waste management and resource recovery reform. There is clear evidence that the waste management and resource recovery industry must embrace higher levels of technology, raise the level of technological capacity of its employees, and present a coherent and competent picture of its capabilities to the community and the key decision makers.

Copies of this paper, which was presented by Paul Howlett at the Waste 2001 Conference, Coffs Harbour, can be obtained from the attached downloadable file. For more information on this paper and related matters please contact Paul Howlett on paul.howlett@wrightstrategy.com

Click here for full document: Waste2001-Howlett

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2. Shifting the Paradigm to Resource Management

History shows that mankind's consumption of resources has outstripped the rate of population increase, and that discard rates roughly correlate with consumption rates. Despite reductions in per capita disposal rates in NSW, Europe and US disposal rates are on the rise. Turning back the tide of consumption is a tough challenge despite the urgings of green groups. A more appropriate challenge to take on is how best to meet the world's unrelenting urge to consume in ways that both conserve natural resources and reduce harm to the environment.

Copies of this paper, which was presented by Tony Wright at the Waste 2001 Conference, Coffs Harbour, can be obtained from the attached downloadable file. For more information on this paper and related matters please contact Tony Wright on tony.wright@wrightstrategy.com

Click here for full document: Waste2001-Wright

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3. Strategies and Options for Implementing the NSW Waste Inquiry Recommendations

Through the Waste Act (1995), the NSW Government established a new platform for managing wastes and resource recovery in NSW. A framework of planning and management responsibility was established and a new regulatory regime was established. The Minister for the Environment formed the Waste Inquiry Implementation Taskforce requesting the outline for an implementation plan based on the recommendations of the Waste Inquiry. The working group focused on initiatives required in three key areas - supply side, system integration and markets. It identified key barriers in each of these areas which, if addressed are likely to result in the more efficient use of our resources.

Copies of this paper, which was presented by Paul Howlett at the Waste Management Association, Queensland Branch Seminar in March 2001, can be obtained from the attached downloadable file. For more information on this paper and related matters please contact Paul Howlett on paul.howlett@wrightstrategy.com

Click here for full document: WMAAQld2001-Howlett

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4. Waste to Resources: The Challenge to Industry & Government

Waste to resources must be more than just the semantics of changing the name of our discards from "wastes" to "resources". Moving from wastes to resources requires moving from end of pipe thinking to address the true causal issues of our over consumption. It requires a mind-shift and a change in perspective that is so significant that it must eventually impact on our values and financial systems, it must change the ways we do business, and it must permeate through to the manner in which governments tax business and the community. A reasonable amount of effort and resources from industry, government and the community, have been expended in waste minimisation and recycling initiatives - yet we are woefully short of making a real difference across the full waste generating spectrum. To move from waste to resources will require vision and direction setting by government, innovation and life cycle approaches by industry, and a shift away from end of pipe thinking on the part of the waste management sector. Until we are prepared to commit to the really tough decisions we will not achieve meaningful and/or sustainable waste reduction and resource conservation. It is not simply changing the name for discards. Do we have what it takes to actually deliver on moving from wastes to resources?

Copies of this paper, which was presented by Paul Howlett at the Waste and Recycling Convention in Perth in August 2000, can be obtained from the attached downloadable file. For more information on this paper and related matters please contact Paul Howlett on paul.howlett@wrightstrategy.com

Click here for full document: WMAAWA2001-Howlett

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5. Eco-efficiency: Industrialists Point of View

Business today is besieged with a plethora of initiatives, programs, operating philosophies and agenda, that makes it nigh impossible for most companies to decide what to embark on, why, and where is it really leading the company. We are all familiar with quality programs, just in time manufacturing, cleaner production. And now we are confronted with eco-efficiency, ESD, sustainability and the triple bottom line. Where will it end?

In this paper I have been asked to reflect on eco-efficiency, the phase of corporate practice considered to be beyond cleaner production. My approach to this request has been to prepare an overview of the evolutionary changes that are confronting industry and highlight some of the drivers that are motivating that change. In the process I place in context cleaner production and then eco-efficiency. However, I believe that beyond eco-efficiency there lies a larger goal - that of sustainability for organisations, communities and society as a whole - and I have constructed a macro context into which I feel many of the elements of good corporate governance fall. It is my hope, that with a contextual framework, organisations embarking on any of the improvement initiatives can understand where that particular initiative fits, where it can lead them and what will logically follow.

Copies of this paper, which was presented by Paul Howlett at the Waste and Recycling Convention in Perth in September 1998, can be obtained from the attached downloadable file. For more information on this paper and related matters please contact Paul Howlett on paul.howlett@wrightstrategy.com

Click here for full document: WMAAWA1998-Howlett

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6. A Framework For Sustainable Recycling

Under the current regimes of policy, planning and management, kerbside recycling in Australia cannot be considered sustainable and will not achieve optimum efficiency. Throughout the country there are many excellent programs, demonstrations, studies and financial support schemes working to keep kerbside recycling viable, but eventually all of these efforts will flounder unless we change our approach to policy, planning and management of the total recycling system. The fundamental flaw lies in the belief that a total free market approach will eventually deliver a market sustainable system. This inappropriate and simplistic view overlooks the immature nature of the recycling sector and the lessons we have learnt from the development of other essential services which are a part of the public/private interface of infrastructure and business. Before we see significant advancement towards sustainability, we need a radical re-think about the policy, planning and management systems needed to satisfy the community demand for on-going recycling.

Copies of this paper, which was presented by Paul Howlett at the13th WWM National Conference in Melbourne in March 1999, can be obtained from the attached downloadable file. For more information on this paper and related matters please contact Paul Howlett on paul.howlett@wrightstrategy.com

Click here for full document: WWMVic1999-Howlett

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7. Waste Minimisation & Recycling Performance Review

Recycling is in a mess. Industry and government alike have failed in their respective duties to deliver a system that is clearly being demanded and supported by the consumers. We have a willing payer for recycling, but we have been unable to agree on how to enable them to pay. Vested interests keep the debate on recycling confined to narrow views of parts of the picture. Governments should not be the leaders in market driven economies. It is time for industry to stand up and lead. Sustainability thinking and philosophies hold the keys to the way forward. But are the steps and determination beyond the capacity of our industry and governments?

Copies of this paper, which was presented by Paul Howlett at the 8th Annual Waste Minimisation and Recycling Conference in Sydney June 1998, can be obtained from the attached downloadable file. For more information on this paper and related matters please contact Paul Howlett on paul.howlett@wrightstrategy.com

Click here for full document: WasteMinReview1998-Howlett

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8. The Waste Management Industry in the Next Millennium

Progressively the waste management industry must come to see itself as a resources management industry if it is to have a sustainable life well into the new millennium. Historically, the industry has been working in the down-stream end of the resources cycle: processing, recycling and disposing of wastes. The challenge for the future is to move into the up-stream resource management areas of minimising wastes, cleaner production and optimising resource utilisation. For waste management companies there will be two key outcomes. Firstly, those companies that do not embrace this broadening of their skill and market base, will become marginalised and confined to collection, recycling and disposal activities, in markets where service providers are differentiated by price alone. Conversely, those companies that do make the shift to widen their services, will find they have growing markets in resources management within client companies and that increasingly their services will become less price competitive and more service value competitive.

Copies of this paper, which was presented by Paul Howlett at the 5th Australian Waste Convention (a part of ENVIRO2000) in Sydney April 2000, can be obtained from the attached downloadable file. For more information on this paper and related matters please contact Paul Howlett on paul.howlett@wrightstrategy.com

Click here for full document: Enviro2000-Howlett

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9. Setting the Context for Alternative Waste Technologies

For many Local Government Councils, and an emerging number of private sector waste managers, alternative waste technologies are seen as a panacea to offset the social and environmental risks associated with landfill-based waste management systems. Landfills are progressively perceived to be inappropriate in or near major population centres and are not considered a preferred option for maximising resource recovery.

However, moving from a landfill-based system to one which includes waste processing is not a simple matter of “going to the market” to see what is on offer. Until the waste generator or waste manager establishes a context within which waste processing technologies are to be implemented, there is no sound or uniform basis to approach the market, and no common ground on which the market can respond.

Click here for full document: WCS-WMAA_June_03

Click here for full presentation: WCS-WMAA_June_03_presentation

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10. A Tool for Crafting the Vision for Sustainable Waste Management

To build the vision it is first essential to address the question "What is possible?" Too often we have seen the vision delivered before the real question is asked - with consequential failed or sub-optimal outcomes.

For several years the authors have been working with government clients helping them to understand just what might be possible before they plunge headlong into delivering their vision.

A key element of this work has been helping clients to understand what is possible, then decide on real purpose and articulate a clear vision. Systematic modeling of options that embody complete systems covering all waste types and sources, logistics pathways and treatment schemes has followed this fundamental work. These options can then be compared using criteria that are relevant to the drivers motivating the client to seek change. A preferred direction can then be selected with confidence.

The paper presents details of the option modeling undertaken and an overview of the relative comparisons that can be used to identify a preferred strategic direction upon which the vision can be confidently built.

Click here for full document: WCS-WMAA_July_05

Click here for full presentation: WCS-WMAA_July_05_presentation

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11. Waste Management Sector Skills Audit and Analysis

Many of our strategic advisory assignments are forward looking to help government and private sector clients determine their strategic direction within the changing resource recovery and waste management environment.  Thus, for some time now, we have been looking at the transformation and maturing of the waste management sector, and at the future trends that the industry will face.

An area of concern for us, and others in and associated with the industry, relates to the current and future skills needs of the industry, and the capacity of the industry to respond to the changing demands that we all foresee.

In one of his many roles, Paul Howlett represents the waste industry at the Construction and Property Services Industry Skills Council (CPSISC) – the successor of the Industry Training Advisory Board.  This organisation has coverage of the waste industry in terms of competencies, training and skills development, and Alan Ross, the CEO of CPSISC indicated that he was prepared to support a Wright Corporate Strategy initiative to underwrite a skills audit and future employment needs analysis for the waste management sector.

Backing up the support from CPSISC, Wright Corporate Strategy received modest financial support from the following five key organisations and agencies involved in waste management to help cover costs of our researcher for the eight-month project:

  • Construction & Property Services Industry Skills Council,
  • Waste Management Association of Australia,
  • Zero Waste SA,
  • NSW Department of Environment and Conservation, and
  • Sustainability Victoria.

The skills audit and needs analysis provides key decision-makers across the industry with vital information on the requirements that must be met if the industry is to deliver on the ambitious targets we have for waste reduction and resource recovery.  Further, this key information will be an essential tool when the industry is involved in bidding for competitive development funds from the Government of Australia to support our industry’s needs in preparing tools and materials that will be required in the years ahead for skills development.

In the first phase of the project, Rebecca Walter our researcher, assembled data relating to labour productivity for various activities in the waste value chain.  For example, both private sector contractors and local government authorities with day labour workforces, give us confidential data on the number of employees that they engage to deliver their various waste management services – including blue collar workers, education officers, contracts managers and white collar staff.  In addition they have given us the number of services that the crews manage.

From this data, and similar data for recycling, transfer stations, landfills, green waste plants etc., we prepared lists of the numbers of people in various job categories per unit of work done – premises services, or tonnes managed – i.e. productivity rates applicable to various industry activities.

This allowed us to prepare an estimate of the total number of people employed in the sectors covered, for each job category at capital city, regional areas, state and national levels, based on documented and estimated services delivered and/or tonnes managed.

Collecting the productivity data was a rather lengthy process, especially with the need to guarantee contributors high levels of confidentiality for their data.  However, we assembled a good spread of data covering metropolitan and non-metropolitan areas, and both the public and private sectors, and we are confident in the relevance of the data for forward comparative projections.

We then looked at the forward projections from each jurisdiction for waste reduction and diversion from disposal to value-adding processing in the near to medium term.  This gave us a set of tonnes to be managed and services to be delivered in the future, against which we applied the productivity metrics to forecast the employment levels in each of the job categories some ten-years hence.

Comparing the two sets of employment data (today and ten-years hence) identified the shift that can be expected in job category numbers and thus the skill demand in the future.

The official outlet for the information collated and publicly available is our web site, and the link below will take you to a report from the project.  However, to broaden distribution of the data, we arranged with the publishers of WME magazine and InsideWaste to incorporate a report as a supplement in one edition of their magazine.  This was accompanied by some advertisements from parties associated with employment, skills and training in the waste management sector, who assisted with the cost of production and run-on printing.

The link below will take you to a copy of the WME document that featured in the May 2006 edition of InsideWaste, and give you access to the key employment and job growth statistics.

We hope that this data can be used productively by the industry and the organisations that support the industry.  And, in conclusion, Wright Corporate Strategy would like to thank the following organisations for their support in defraying some of our costs in researching, preparing and making this material widely available to the industry:

Financial Support:

  • Construction & Property Services Industry Skills Council,
  • Waste Management Association of Australia,
  • Zero Waste SA,
  • NSW Department of Environment and Conservation,  and
  • Sustainability Victoria.

Advertising Support in Editorial Supplement:

  • Zero Waste SA,
  • Gordon Institute of TAFE,
  • Into Training Australia
  • APC Environmental Management, and
  • Thiess Services

Editorial and Publishing Support:

  • WME Media

Click here for full document: Waste Management Sector Skills Audit and Analysis

Click here for presentation: Skills Audit PPT.pdf

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